Sunday, 30 November 2008

Ancestry Tours of Charing Cross Glasgow Scotland


Ancestry Tours of Charing Cross, Glasgow, Scotland.

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Saturday, 29 November 2008

John Wilson Ancestry Paisley Scotland

John Wilson, (1785-1854), was born on 18th May 1785 in Paisley, Renfrewshire, Scotland. His father was a wealthy gauze manufacturer and his mother, Margaret Sym, was a descendant of James Graham, Marquis of Montrose. Wilson was privately educated by a Church of Scotland minister in the neighbouring parish of Mearns and, on the death of his father in 1795, at the University of Glasgow. Between 1803 and 1807 he was a Gentleman-Commoner at Magdalen College, Oxford, where he gained a reputation as a prodigious athlete. A well-built, burly man, Wilson retained a lifelong interest in walking tours and athletic pursuits. On his graduation Wilson moved to his small estate of Elleray in the Lake District, which he had bought with his patrimony; during his time in the country he was a close associate and friend of the Wordsworths and Thomas de Quincey. In 1811 he married Jane Penny, the daughter of a Liverpool merchant, but three years later he lost the greater part of his fortune owing to his uncle's mismanagement of the estate. He was forced to take up residence with his family in Edinburgh where he was admitted to the Faculty Of Advocates.
Wilson started writing poetry during his period at Elleray; his work was palely derivative of the Lake school and in 1812 he published his first collection, Isle of Palms and Other Poems. Although the volume attracted some attention when it was published, the title poem, which tells the story of a young couple shipwrecked in a pastoral, pre-Satanic Eden, is overlong and cloyed with vapid sentimentality. This was followed in the same year by The Magic Mirror, which was addressed to Sir Walter Scott, and in 1816 Wilson published a third long poem, The City of the Plague. Despite their weaknesses, the two 1812 publications gained for Wilson a reputation in Edinburgh's literary society; his acquaintance with William Backwood led to his becoming an intimate of Blackwood's saloon at 17 Princes Street, where he met, among others, John Gibson Lockhart, who was also studying law. In October 1817 he joined with Lockhart and James Hogg in editing the first issue of Blackwood's Magazine, which contained the notorious Chaldee Manuscript and critical attacks on Leigh Hunt. Although Wilson was forced to flee temporarily to Elleray in the ensuing uproar he continued to be a contributing editor to Blackwood's; he wrote several notable series, such as the Noctes Ambrosianae, between 1822 and 1835, in which he took the persona of Christopher North, and Lights and Shadows of Scottish Life, collected 1822, stories of country life which are precursors of the kailyard school of rural sentimentality. He published two novels, The Trials of Margaret Lyndsay (1823) and The Foresters (1825); both are celebrations of the intelligently pious peasantry and its progress from squalor and tribulation to an innocent, earthly paradise.
Wilson's influence on Blackwood's Magazine was considerable and he used his editorial powers to promote high Tory politics and an idyllic, parochial simplicity in literature. His feelings towards his friends and fellow contributors were ambiguous, especially towards James Hogg whom he would praise in one issue and then lampoon in the next.

In 1820 Wilson was appointed to the Chair of Moral Philosophy at the University of Edinburgh, in succession to Dr Thomas Brown, his election being due to the pro-Tory Town Council who made all professional appointments. Lacking any formal qualifications, Wilson relied on notes supplied by his friend from Glasgow days, Alexander Blair, who was Professor of Rhetoric and Belles Lettres at University College, London, between 1831 and 1834, and on the strength of his own eloquent rhetoric. He held the post until 1851, when ill health forced him to retire, and he died on 3 April 1854. His eldest daughter, Margaret Ann, married the nephew of Susan Edmonstone Ferrier, James Frederick Ferrier, who edited his father-in-law's works; his youngest daughter, Jane Emily, married William Edmondstoune Aytoun, Professor of Rhetoric and Belles Lettres in the University of Edinburgh.

His works include; A Recommendation of the Study of the Remains of Ancient Grecian and Roman Architecture Sculpture and Painting (1807); Lines Sacred to the Memory of the Rev. James Grahame (1811); The Isle of Palms and Other Poems (1812); The Magic Mirror (1812); The City of the Plague (1816); Lights and Shadows of Scottish Life (1822); The Trials of Margaret Lyndsay (1823); The Foresters (1825); Poems (1825); with John Gibson Lockhart, Janus, or the Edinburgh Literary AImanack (1826); Blind Allan (1840); The Land of Burns (1840); The Recreations of Christopher North (1842); The Noctes Ambrosianae, 4 vols. (1843); Scotland Illustrated (1845); Specimens of the British Critics by Christopher North (1846); Essays Critical and Imaginative, 4 vols. (1866).

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Ancestry Tours of Morar Scotland


Ancestry Tours of Morar, Road to the Isles, Scotland.

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Tuesday, 25 November 2008

Ancestry Tours of Dunskey Castle Scotland


Ancestry Tours of Dunskey Castle, Dumfries and Galloway, Scotland. This castle is located a mile south of Portpatrick and about ten miles from Stranraer.

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Saturday, 22 November 2008

McDiarmid Ancestry Glasgow Scotland

John McDiarmid, 1790-1852, was born in Glasgow, the son of the minister of the Gaelic Church. His early life was spent as a clerk in the Commercial Bank in Edinburgh, but by 1817 his growing interest in publishing led him to join Charles Maclaren hand William Ritchie shortly after they had founded Te Scotsman newspaper. Later that year he moved to Dumfries where he established the Dumfries and Galloway Courier. A friend of many of the leading writers of his day, McDiarmid acted as a legal adviser to Jean Armour, the widow of Robert Burns. Politically on the left, he was one of the first campaigning journalists in Scotland to see the use that could be made of the press in public affairs. He edited a collection of poems by William Cowper and wrote on the topography of Dumfries and Galloway. His works include; An Enquiry into the Principles of Civil and Military Subordination (1806); ed., Poetical Works of William Cowper (1818); The Scrap Book (1821); Sketches from Nature (1830); Picture of Dumfries (1832).

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Monday, 17 November 2008

Ancestry Tours of Corrichatachan Scotland


Ancestry Tours of Corrichatachan, near Broadford, Isle of Skye, Scotland. Corrichatachan is where Dr Johnson and James Boswell stayed with the Reverend Martin MacPherson on their tour of the Isle of Skye in the 1700's.

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Saturday, 15 November 2008

Beattie Ancestry Scotland

James Beattie, (1735-1803). Poet and philosopher. He was born on 25 October 1735 in Laurencekirk, Kincardineshire, the son of a shopkeeper. He was educated at the village school and in 1749 he matriculated at Marischal College, Aberdeen. Between 1753 and 1758 Beattie taught at the village school at Fordoun, before becoming a master at Aberdeen Grammar School; he was unexpectedly appointed Professor of Moral Philosophy at the University of Aberdeen in 1760, a post he held for 30 years. He became a close friend of JAMES burnett, Lord Monboddo, and was a frequent visitor to London, where he enjoyed a high standing in literary and political circles. In his latter years Beattie was incapacitated by rheumatism and was awarded a state pension. He died on 18th August 1803 in Aberdeen. His biography was written by Sir William Forbes'in Account of the Life and Writings of James Beattie, LL.D.

Beattie first came to public attention as a poet through the publication of his long poem The Minstel, written in two books in 1771 and 1774. It is in Spenserian stanzas and Beattie described it as 'a moral and serious poem'; it follows, in fashionable, high-flown Augustan tones, a poetic visionary's symbolic journey from chaos to a true understanding of art. His other works, parodies and satires in the style of Alexander Pope, have been long forgotten, though his epistle 'To Mr Alexander Ross' was often anthologized in the 19th century. His reputation as a poet has also been tarnished by his support for the ossian poems by James macpherson.

As a philosopher Beattie enjoyed some success in his day for his attack on David Hume, in Essay on Truth (1770), a work that has long been discredited by metaphysicians. His other philosophical works are, principally, Elements of Moral Science (1790-93), Dissertations, Moral and Critical (1783) and The Evidences of the Christian Religion Briefly and Plainly Stated (1786), all of which echo Beattie's interest in religion and its application to philosophy. In 1779 he published his Scoticisms, Arranged in Alphabetical Order, Designed to Correct Improprieties of Speech and Writing, which was produced originally for his students, who had 'no opportunity of learning English from the company they kept', but which is also an indication of the desire of many of the intellectuals of Beattie's period to speak correct, Augustan English.

Works: Original Poems and Translations (1760); The Judgement of Paris (1765); Poems on Several Subjects (1766); An Essay on the Nature and Immutability of Truth (1770); The Minstrel, 2 vols. (1771-4); Essays on Poetry (1778); Scoticisms, Arranged in Alphabetical Order, Designed to Correct Improprieties of Speech and Writing (1779);
Dissertations, Moral and Critical (1783); The Evidences of the Christian Religion Briefly and Plainly Stated, 1 vols. (1786); Elements of Moral Science, (1790-93).

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Friday, 14 November 2008

Ancestry Tours of Monymusk Scotland


Ancestry Tours of Monymusk, Aberdeenshire, Scotland.

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Barrie Ancestry Scotland

Sir James Matthew Barrie, 1860-1937). Dramatist and novelist. He was born on the 9th of ay 1860 in Kirriemuir, Scotland, the ninth child of a weaver. When Barrie was seven, David, his older brother and his mother's favourite son, was killed in a skating accident; from that date Barrie strove to fill the vacant place in his
mother's affections and he became exceptionally close to her. In later life he told the story of that relationship in a sentimental biography, Margaret Ogiivy (1896). Between 1867 and 1871 he was educated at the Glasgow Academy where his oldest brother, Alexander, was a master, and subsequently at Forfar Academy and Dumfries Academy from 1873 to 1878, when he matriculated at the University of Edinburgh. There he studied English in the class of Professor David Masson and he became a regular reviewer of theatre for the Edinburgh Courant and of books for The Scotsman. In 1882 he was appointed a leader-writer on the Nottingham Journal and he held the post until 1884 when he returned home to Kirriemuir. From there he began contributing to Sir Frederick Greenwood's St James's Gazette and Cornhill Magazine the stories of Scottish village life, its characters and religious principles, told to him by hismother. These were later published in Auld Light Idylls (1888) and they present a humorous, but sentimental, caricature of rural manners in Thrums, the village that disguised the reality of Kirriemuir. Their cloying picture of rural life belongs properly to the kailyard school of writing. A second collection, A Window in Thrums, was published in 1889.

In 1885 Barrie moved to London to work as a journalist and he started writing, under the pseudonym Gavin Ogilvy, for the British Weekly, which was edited by William Robertson Nicoll. Barrie's growing success was consolidated by his second novel When a Man's Single (1888) (Better Dead, his first novel, had been published at his own expense in 1886 and it was reissued in 1888), An Edinburgh Eleven: Pen Portraits of College Life (1889), his reminiscences of university life in Edinburgh, and his most successful novel The Little Minister (1891), which he dramatized for the stage in 1897. Barrie married the actress Mary Ansellon 9 July 1894 but their marriage seems never to have been consummated and it broke up in 1909 when Mary left him for Gilbert Canaan, a barrister and secretary to Barrie's Censorship Committee. Something of the futility of Barrie's marriage can be seen in two novels, Sentimental Tommy (1896) and its sequel Tommy and Grizel (1900). Barrie visited America in 1896 and on his return he met the Llewellyn Davies family with whom, especially the children, George, Jack, Peter, Michael and Nicholas, he was to enjoy a close relationship.

For the boys he wrote The Little White Bird (1902), a fantasy set in Kensington Gardens, and out of that book and out of their close relationship he wrote his best-known work, Peter Pan, or The Boy who Wouldn't Grow Up (1904): "I suppose I always knew that I made Peter Pan by rubbing the five of you violently together, as savages with two sticks produce a flame. I am sometimes asked who and what Peter is, but that is all he is, the spark I got from you." (Unpublished draft of the dedication to a performance of Peter Pan in 1926.) The play was Barrie's greatest success and has remained popular with children ever since, with its make-believe world of fairies, pirates and Red Indians in the Never-Never Land inhabited by Peter Pan. It also contains elements of Barrie's own obsession with mother love and with the lost world of childhood. The story of the play was published in book form in Peter and Wendy in 1911. Barrie's first successful play was The Little Minister (1897), and from the beginning of his theatrical career he demonstrated a command of language and grasp of stagecraft, allied to an ability to create rounded, realistic characters. His principal plays were as follows (here and throughout this paragraph dates given are those of first performance); Quality Street (1901), a love story set in the Napoleonic Wars; The Admirable Crichton (1902), a comedy about the effects of a butler becoming a dictator when a family is shipwrecked; What Every Woman Knows (1908), which suggests that behind every successful man is a stalwart, charming wife like Maggie, who in the memorable first act questions her position as an appendage to her husband; A Kiss for Cinderella (1916), an attempt to revive the fantasy of Peter Pan; Dear Brutus (1917) which with its famous, sentimental scene in Lob's wood explores the theme that people can be given a second chance in life; Mary Rose (1920), a whimsical story about a dead mother's love for her son; Shall We Join the Ladies ? (1921) an uncompleted murder mystery; and his last play, an unsuccessful religious drama, The Boy David (1936).

After the deaths of Arthur Llewelyn Davies in 1907 and his wife in 1910, Barrie's relationship with their sons grew even closer and he became their guardian and unofficial step-father. He also befriended the family of Captain Robert Scott (1868 -1912), the Polar explorer. Barrie's adoration of attractive women and their children was to remain an obsession throughout his life; he also enjoyed the friendship of many of the leading political and literary men of his time. His services to literature were rewarded with a baronetcy in 1913 (he had turned down a knighthood in 1909), and other public honours, including the Order of Merit in 1922, the year that, as Rector of the University of St Andrews, he gave his rectorial address on 'Courage'; he was also Chancellor of the University of Edinburgh. He died on 19 June 1937.

Barrie was one of the most successful and popular dramatists of his day but none of his plays has withstood the test of time. In some works such as The Admirable Crichton and What Every Woman Knows, he questioned social mores, but in weak endings he allowed the status quo Co prevail (Crichton returns to his position as a butler, Maggie takes up her wifely duties), although in the latter play his portrait of a Scotsman 'on the make' is perfectly drawn. As his career progressed he became increasingly involved in the worlds of fantasy and faery and in the search for the lost world of childhood, and he is still best remembered for the creation of Peter Pan. In his early Scottish stories sentimentality and bathos are occasionally kept at bay by his pawky humour and social observation, but at the heart the Auld Licht stories, set in Thrums, are artificial and devoid of life. His other novels and works of non-fiction are: My Lady Nicotine (1890), a novel extolling the joys of smoking; Courage (1922), the text of his St Andrews rectorial address; The Greenwood Hat (1930), a privately printed collection of autobiographical sketches; and Farewell Miss Julie Logan (1932), a love story set in Scotland.

Works: Better Dead (1886); Auld Licht Idylls (1888); When a Man's Single (1888);
An Edinburgh Eleven: Pen Portraits of College Life (1889); A Window in Thrums 1889); My Lady Nicotine (1890); The Little Minister (1891); Richard Savage (1891); A Holiday in Bed (1892); Allahakbarries (1893); An Auld Licht Manse (1893); with Arthur Conan Doyle, Jane Annie (1893); A Lady's Shoe (1893); A Tillyloss Scandal (1893); Two of Them (1893); The Sabbath Day (1895); Scotland's Lament (1895);
Margaret Ogiivy (1896); Sentimental Tommy (1896); The Allahakbarrie Book of Broadway Cricket for 1899 (1899); Life in a Country Manse (1899); Tommy and Grizel (1900);
The Wedding Guest (1900); The Little White Bird (1902); Peter Pan in Kensington Gardens (1906); Walker, London (1907); George Meredith (1909); Peter and Wendy (1911); Quality Street (1913); The Admirable Crichton (1914); Oer Tag (1914); Half Hours (1914) Pantaloon (1914) Rosalind (1914); The Twelve-Pound Look (1914); The Will (1914); Charles Frohman (1915); Shakespeare's Legacy (1917); Who was Sarah Findlay ? by Mark Twain. With a Suggested Solution of the Mystery (1917); Echoes of the War (1918); The New Word (1918); The Old Lady Shows Her Medals (1918); A Well Remembered Voice (1918); What Every Woman Knows (1918); A Kiss for Cinderella (1920); Courage (1922); Dear Brutus (1923); Mary Rose (1924); Neil and Tintinnabulum (1925); Shall We Join the Ladies? (1927); TheGreenwood Hat (WO); Farewell Miss Julie Logon (1932).



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Wednesday, 12 November 2008

Malloy Ancestry Scotland

Dear Sandy, My name is Lawrence McMillan Malloy. My first ggreat grandfather came from Jura Isle, Scotland. He was a Molloy, but after arrival in America the name was changed to Malloy. My nickname is Mac as the McMillan has been in my family for more than 200 years. I believe that my middle name is far more important than my last name, Malloy. We are known as Scots-Irish people and a sept to the MacMillan, Macmillan clan. Am I right. I personally have great pride with my middle name and much less than my last name. Both Malloy and McMillan are family names.

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Ancestry Tours of Firth of Clyde Scotland


Ancestry Tours of Firth of Clyde, Scotland.

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Monday, 10 November 2008

Ancestry Tours of Setter Scotland


Ancestry Tours of Setter, Shetland Islands, Scotland.

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Ancestry Tours of Ashkirk Scotland


Ancestry Tours of Ashkirk, Selkirkshire, Scottish Borders, Scotland.

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Ancestry Tours of Ringford Scotland


Ancestry Tours of Ringford, Dumfries and Galloway, Kirkcudbrightshire, Scotland.

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Scottish Saying Ancestry Scotland

Hi Sandy, My cousins and I are of Scottish parents, who migrated to East Africa,
Kenya, after the second World War. After political problems in Kenya, we then migrated to Australia some years later. My last elderly Aunt from Glasgow died recently, and we were trying to trace the origin of some sayings that she used frequently. I did not get any joy on the net, so wondered if you have any idea! One of the sayings was "Lord God King of the Isles". Does this have any reference to Bonnie Prince Charlie would you know? Another common one, was "Thinks he's Lord Muck." Perhaps you could direct me to a site that deals with scottish sayings? Or perhaps know of a book? Thanks for your time, Regards, Cath Keese (nee Glen), Mandurah, Western Australia. Scottish Sayings.

Barron Ancestry Scotland

Dear Sandy, I am William Nathaniel Gale Barron III and curious about family myths and Barron surname. The Barron's have been in America since the 1770' the US and supposedly came from Northern Ireland. One story is that we were Scottish Fitzgerald's who were moved to Ireland when Cromwell seeded Northern Ireland with protestants. On arriving in Ireland they changed the name to Barron in an attempt reduce bias against a Scottish surname. The brothers Joseph and Hugh Barron arrived in the US supposedly in 1770's and from Northern Ireland possibly Antrim County. I would greatly value your thoughts on this. Best Regards, Bill.

Harriett Stewart Ancestry Scotland

Hello Sandy, I have run into a roadblock researching my gr-gr-grandmother's parents who were born in Scotland. Her name is Harriett Stewart although my grandmother, who's family was from Lanark, Lanarkshire, said she was really a Stuart. Her marriage to James Brown took place in Canada, in Huron County. Harriet was born in Nova Scotia in 1837-38. She died in Bruce County, Ontario and is buried in the Kincardine Cemetery there. She is listed as a Stewart. All I have to go by is the naming pattern of the children. This indicates that her father was Alexander and her mother was Agnes. I did find an Agnes buried in Southampton Cemetery in Ontario who was born in Scotland in 1807. I also found an Agnes Stewart born 1815 who died 18 Nov 1882 and who's address is Port Elgin, Ontario. Her gravestone says she died of "brokittis" so it isn't surprising that her place of birth is given as 'Skugill, Scotland." I'm assuming this is Skergill but not able to find it or know where it is. My grandmother lived in Port Elgin so it could be the right family.

An Alex Stuart(tenant) emigrated from Kiltearn, Scotland on the ship Sarah with a Mary Stuart (spinster) and Murdo Stuart (9); Donald Stuart (4) Ann Stuart (2) and infant in 1801. I guess it's possible that this could be his parents. I have never seen the name Murdo in ancestrial generations, though.

Another Alex Stewart emigrated on the ship Dove in 1801. Alex is a tenant and he's with Margaret Stewart, spinster. Margaret is a common thread throughout the generations. He was from Athol.

Agnes Stewart is buried in the east half of a plot (159R) and an Alex Angus is buried in the west half on June 21, 1882 at age 68. Alex and his brother Peter Angus owned a sawmill and after Peter returned to Scotland. He sold the mill to James Blanchfield Smith at that time. (also Smithe). A John McNabb said that Peter returned to Scotland after living in Southampton for 35 years. These brothers came from Thurso, in Caithness, on the far north-eastern shore of Scotland. They settled in Bruce County (Southampton) in 1851. I had always suspected that Agnes's last name could be Smith. So it didn't surprise me to see that a Mr. Smithe bought the mill. However, I think that all of these people could be related.

I wondered if you would be able to offer any suggestions as to where I could go next with the research. I think she had a brother Robert, Archibald, Alexander and a sister Mary and maybe Margaret. Early settlers to Bruce were Alexander, Archibald and Moses Stewart. They could be the same ones or at least related. Any help would be most appreciated. Thank you. Vonnie.

Scottish Gypsy Surnames

Hello Sandy, I came across your site whilst googling for any site which listed Gypsy Surnames. I live in Western Australia and having been working on W.A History for many years. After a group of us compiled the Convict Dictionary, I had a theory that many of them would have been Romany and that is what I am finding. I have just started on Scottish records on line, to try and put together an Index of Scottish Gypsy names so that I can cross reference them here in W.A. When I saw your site, I wondered if you know of any other surnames apart from what are listed there. I would appreciate any help that you could give. Even on line sites. I am of Gypsy descent on 2 lines of my family tree. My 4 x Great Grandfather was John FARR. Jan James.

Donald James Sillers Ancestry Scotland

Hello Sandy, I have just read that most interesting CLANS OF SHISKINE by Charles Robertson. It certainly provides a good insight into the conditions that led to families emigrating to seek better conditions. My sister-in-law is widow of Donald James Sillers, (this is the spelling the family uses now) a descendant of one of those tenants of Monyquil who sought better circumstance in Canada. "Don" is apparently the descendant of Duncan Sillars and his wife Marian Millar who came with family to Canada in 1831. I am trying to compile a family history of this Sillars line. Can you provide assistance with the family as they lived on the Isle of Arran? Contacts or sources for information? Harry A. Tatro, Calgary, Alberta, Canada.

John Mcdonald Little Dunkeld Churchyard Scotland


Little Dunkeld Churchyard Scotland.

Hi Sandy, I have be reading you little dunkeld history review and found it very interesting. My great grand farther was the station master at Dalguise and wrote poetry and had it sold for the benefit of the red cross. I am researching my family tree and i have visited the grave yard you mention were my great grand farther grave is located (John Mcdonald) I would be very interested if you have information regarding the tombstones records or information that may be of some interest to me. Regards, Robert Macdonald.

Sunday, 9 November 2008

Aytoun Ancestry Tours Of Scotland

William Edmondstoune Aytoun, 1813-65). Poet and humorist. He was born on the 21st of June, 1813, in Edinburgh. His father was a writer To The Signet and one of the founders of the Edinburgh Academy, to which Aytoun was sent in 1824. Between 1828 and 1833 he studied law at the University of Edinburgh, and he published his first collection of poems, mainly romantic pastiches, Poland, Homer and Other Poems in 1832. On graduating he travelled in Germany before joining his father's law firm. In 1836 he made his first contributions to Blackwood's Magazine, associating himself with its conservative politics; for Blackwood's Magazine he wrote over 200 poems, political articles and short stories, including How we got up the Glenmutchkin Railway, October, 1845, a droll expose of railway mania which indicted both unscrupulous speculators and gullible buyers, and How I stood for the Dreepdailly Burghs, September, 1847, a satire on political sycophancy. Aytoun formally joined the staff of Blackwood's in 1844 and the following year he was appointed Professor of Rhetoric and Belles Lettres at the University of Edinburgh. On 11 April 1849 he married Jane Emily, the daughter of John Wilson. He continued to practise at the Bar and for his support of Protectionism, Derby's government rewarded him with the Sheriffship and Lord Admiralty of Orkney and Shetland in 1852. With Sir Theodore Martin, Aytoun wrote The Book of Ballads edited by Bon Gaultier (1845), Bon Gaultier being the pseudonym that Martin had used previously. The ballads are parodies and burlesques of contemporary poems such as Tennyson's Locksley Hall and Hunt's Rimini which had appeared originally in Eraser's Magazine and Tait's Edinburgh Magazine. They were added to and republished in 1857 and are known popularly as The Bon Gaultier Ballads. Aytoun's best-known work is Lays of The Scottish Cavaliers and Other Poems, published in 1849, which became a Victorian bestseller. The ballad romances, written in the style of Sir Walter Scott and Thomas Babington Macaulay, deal with such historical subjects as the Battle of Flodden, the pilgrimage of The Black Douglas to the Holy Land to bury the heart of Robert the Bruce, and an account of exiled soldiers of John Graham, Bonnie Dundee, fighting in the service of the French. In 1856 Aytoun published Bothwell, a long poem about the events surrounding the relationship of Mary, Queen of Scots, with her third husband James Hepburn, 4th Earl of Bothwell. Written in ballad form, it is marred by historical inaccuracy and its dependency on the monologue of its hero. Aytoun also published The Ballads of Scotland (1858), a collection of 139 carefully excised Scottish ballads. His autobiographical novel, Norman Sinclair, was published four years before his death on 4th August 1865. A memoir of his life was published by his friend and collaborator Sir Theodore Martin in 1867. Works: Poland, Homer and Other Poems; The Life and Times of Richard the First; Our Zion, or Presbyterian Popery, by ane of that llk; The Drummond Schism Examined and Exposed; The Book of Ballads edited by Bon Gaultier; Lays of the Scottish Cavaliers and Other Poems; Bothwell: a Poem; The Ballads of Scotland.

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Ancestry Tours of Dalmellington Scotland


Ancestry Tours of Dalmellington, Ayrshire, Scotland.

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Saturday, 8 November 2008

Aird Ancestry Tours of Scotland

Thomas Aird or(1802-76). Poet. He was born on the 28th August, 1802 at Bowden, Roxburghshire. He was educated locally and at the University of Edinburgh, and during his student days became acquainted with Thomas Carlyle and James Hogg. Aird became a regular contributor to Blackwood's magazine and through the influence of John Wilson was appointed editor of the Dumfries and Galloway Herald in 1835. He died on 25th April, 1876 in Dumfries. Aird's poetry is mostly concerned with nature, treated in a Wordsworthian vein, and Carlyle said of it: "he found everywhere a healthy breath as of mountain breezes". His Works included: Murtzoufle: a Tragedy in Three Acts and Other Poems (1826); Religious Characteristics (1827); The Captive of Fez (1830); Orthuriel and Other Poems (1840); The Old Bachelor in the Scottish Village (1845); Poetical Works (1848).

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Thursday, 6 November 2008

Ancestry Tours of Corsock Scotland


Ancestry Tours of Corsock, Dumfries and Galloway, Scotland.

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Ancestry Tours of Gamrie Scotland


Ancestry Tours of Gamrie, Banffshire, Scotland.

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Ancestry Tours of Millhouse Scotland


Ancestry Tours of Millhouse, Argyll and Bute, Scotland.

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